There’s no good option in Syria. But there’s a way to make Assad pay

We are caught between a rock, in the form of the recklessness of Donald Trump, and a hard place, shaped by the cruelty of Bashar al-Assad. This is the choice that now confronts citizens and their representatives in Britain, France and the US. The reasons to resist signing up for any project led by Trump should be obvious, with the newly published testimony of James Comey, the FBI director he fired, providing a fresh reminder.

Published by: The Guardian

There’s no good option in Syria. But there’s a way to make Assad pay

We are caught between a rock, in the form of the recklessness of Donald Trump, and a hard place, shaped by the cruelty of Bashar al-Assad. This is the choice that now confronts citizens and their representatives in Britain, France and the US. The reasons to resist signing up for any project led by Trump should be obvious, with the newly published testimony of James Comey, the FBI director he fired, providing a fresh reminder.

Published by: The Guardian

Zuckerberg got off lightly. Why are politicians so bad at asking questions?

When Mark Zuckerberg appears on Capitol Hill again for a second round of questioning, he will be hoping for nothing so much as a rerun of yesterday’s performance. That went so well, Facebook’s share price leapt 4.5% on the day – with most of the boost coinciding with Zuckerberg’s supposed grilling by a committee of senators. The headlines were exactly what he’d wanted too: “Mark Zuckerberg outwits Congress,” declared the Axios website.

Published by: The Guardian

Antisemitism matters: Jews are the canary in the coalmine

Easter? The very word gives me a migraine.” Not my view, but that of an old family friend who couldn’t shake the folk memory of Easter as pogrom season, a time of anti-Jewish attacks as Christians resurrected the libel that it was the Jews, rather than the Romans, who killed Jesus. But this weekend is also Passover, when Jews retell the story that defines them as a people, sitting around a Seder table and recalling through words, song and, crucially, food their exodus from slavery in Egypt.

Published by: The Guardian

The people owned the web, tech giants stole it. This is how we take it back

I blame the T-shirts. The casual wear favoured by those founding wunderkinds of tech – Mark Zuckerberg, Steve Jobs, Sergey Brin, Larry Page and the rest – lulled us into a false sense of security. Even after they’d begun making serious money, too many of us took the aversion to a collar and tie to mean the likes of Facebook or Google were not really scary capitalist behemoths, but retained the spirit of the upstart startup: quirky, plucky and driven chiefly by a desire to do cool stuff with computers. They certainly saw themselves that way, Google charmingly distilling its mission statement into three words: “Don’t be evil.” It’s amazing how long an initial image of laidback informality can endure: for decades, Britons struggled to see Virgin as a corporate giant because Richard Branson had long hair and a goatee.

Published by: The Guardian