It isn’t just tech giants that disown responsibility for terrorist attacks

It was nearly a decade ago now, when social media – and indeed my children – were in their infancy. My eldest son, then six, had a favourite toy, a remote-control car that could navigate water as well as land. He filmed it in the park, as it ploughed through muddy puddles, and wanted to post the video on YouTube. To add to what was then a novel experience, he added a soundtrack. To reinforce the watery theme, he chose Neil Young’s Down by the River.

Published by: The Guardian

The Middle East peace process makes great theatre – but in reality, it’s dead

If you want to see Israelis and Palestinians attempt to make peace, you should head for the National Theatre in London – because you certainly won’t see them doing it anywhere else, least of all in the land they both call home. On stage, it’s all there. The sweat, the tears, the angst are laid bare in Oslo, the Tony-award winning play whose London transfer is just beginning. It tells the improbable story of the secret back-channel opened up by two Norwegian diplomats in the early 1990s, which ultimately led to the White House lawn, where Yasser Arafat and Yitzhak Rabin shook hands, watched by a smiling Bill Clinton, 24 years ago.

Published by: The Guardian

Move over, Nelson! These are the statues modern Britain needs

From colonialists to Confederates, the debate over who should be honoured is raging around the world. We asked Guardian readers to nominate deserving figures yet to be carved in stone. Here, we make the case for people ranging from David Attenborough and JK Rowling to Peter Tatchell and Britain’s first Asian MP

Published by: The Guardian

Trump’s fascist contagion gives the anti-Brexit cause what it lacked: an emotional heart

To the remainer, and even to the neutral, our current politics contains a big mystery. Put simply, where is the sentiment we hoped to call regrexit? Where is the collective outbreak of buyer’s remorse? After all, the evidence that Brexit will be the greatest error in our national history since Munich is piling up. It’s not just that a process the leavers used to say would be quick and easy is proving to be long and torturously difficult, or that the European economies are growing while ours is sluggish. It’s more fundamental than that.

Published by: The Guardian

This Brexit leak shines a light on our collective lunacy about immigration

Whoever leaked this document has done us all a great service. True, we don’t know what motive led the UK government blueprint for post-Brexit immigration to be handed to the Guardian. It could have been done by an enthusiast for the plan, keen to ensure that there’s no backsliding and that ministers stand firm. Or, more likely, the leaker was appalled by a document that sees migrants as a menace to be repelled – and hoped public disclosure might generate enough opposition to kill the plan off.

Published by: The Guardian

There’s a disaster much worse than Texas. But no one talks about it

A quick quiz. No Googling, no conferring, but off the top of your head: what is currently the world’s worst humanitarian disaster? If you nominated storm Harvey and the flooding of Houston, in Texas, then don’t be too hard on yourself. Media coverage of that disaster has been intense, and the pictures dramatic. You’d be forgiven for thinking that this supposedly once-in-a-thousand-years calamity – now happening with alarming frequency, thanks to climate change – was the most devastating event on the planet.

Published by: The Guardian

What’s next for Scottish Labour after Kezia Dugdale’s exit?

The obvious way to read the surprise resignation of Kezia Dugdale as leader of the Scottish Labour party is to cast her as the victim of a likely putsch by forces loyal to Jeremy Corbyn. According to this view, Dugdale jumped before she was pushed, pre-empting the challenge she would have faced sooner or later as punishment for opposing Corbyn from the start – a position rendered unsustainable by the UK leader’s better-than-expected performance in June’s general election.

Published by: The Guardian

We thought the Nazi threat was dead. But Donald Trump has revived it

The word from the White House is that the events at Charlottesville are behind them now, and they’re ready to move on. Sure, there is still some fallout from the 12 August march by neo-Nazis, white supremacists and the Ku Klux Klan, as well as from Donald Trump’s subsequent declaration that those racists and fascists who carried flaming torches and swastika flags included some “very fine people”. There are reverberations too from the president’s initial non-condemnation condemnation, in which if he saw “hatred, bigotry and violence” at all, he saw it “on many sides”.

Published by: The Guardian

Trump is the real nuclear threat, and we can’t just fantasise him away

Among the many terrifying facts that have emerged in the last several days, perhaps the scariest relate to the nuclear button over which now hovers the finger of Donald Trump. It turns out that, of all the powers held by this or any other US president, the least checked or balanced is his authority over the world’s mightiest arsenal. He exercises this awesome, civilisation-ending power alone.

Published by: The Guardian