Who’d have thought it? Jeremy Corbyn could shape Britain’s destiny in Europe

It’s a fair bet that never, ever did the British establishment imagine that one day it would be resting its hopes on Jeremy Corbyn. For years the likes of David Cameron, George Osborne, the governor of the Bank of England, the heads of most FTSE companies and the masters of the City of London – to say nothing of Peter Mandelson and the entire New Labour aristocracy – would either have mocked Corbyn or struggled to place his name.

Published by: The Guardian

Who’d have thought it? Jeremy Corbyn could shape Britain’s destiny in Europe

It’s a fair bet that never, ever did the British establishment imagine that one day it would be resting its hopes on Jeremy Corbyn. For years the likes of David Cameron, George Osborne, the governor of the Bank of England, the heads of most FTSE companies and the masters of the City of London – to say nothing of Peter Mandelson and the entire New Labour aristocracy – would either have mocked Corbyn or struggled to place his name.

Published by: The Guardian

Who’d have thought it? Jeremy Corbyn could shape Britain’s destiny in Europe

It’s a fair bet that never, ever did the British establishment imagine that one day it would be resting its hopes on Jeremy Corbyn. For years the likes of David Cameron, George Osborne, the governor of the Bank of England, the heads of most FTSE companies and the masters of the City of London – to say nothing of Peter Mandelson and the entire New Labour aristocracy – would either have mocked Corbyn or struggled to place his name.

Published by: The Guardian

Let a Muslim run London

Predictions are a mug's game in today's volatile politics, but I stand by the one I made on these pages back in September: if Labour goes into the next general election led by Jeremy Corbyn, the party will receive the lowest Jewish vote in its history....

Published by: The Jewish Chronicle

Amid the bloodshed, Palestinians and Israelis are giving up on themselves

The contrast was not a happy one. For much of the last week, I’ve been travelling across Israel speaking to those involved in what they see as their country’s finest hour, an event whose 40th anniversary falls this July: the 1976 operation that rescued 102 hostages from Entebbe airport in Uganda. At the time, the sheer audacity and ingenuity of the raid – flying an elite unit of commandos into a faraway airport in the dead of night, killing the hijackers and freeing their captives – captured the imagination of the world. It spawned not one but two Hollywood movies and remained a byword for thrilling derring-do. Those involved – the soldiers, the military planners, the rescued families – look back on that moment still with unalloyed pride.

Published by: The Guardian